Two New ColecoVision Cartridges - Zippy Race and Pyramid Warp/Battleship Clapton II

Bill Loguidice's picture

Zippy RaceZippy RaceFrom the guys who brought you the Mr. Chin MSX conversion, comes Pyramid Warp/Battleship Clapton II, which ships next week and Zippy Race, which is accepting orders now. Each game is $60 and comes boxed with a manual. I'm looking forward to mine.

Check out their Website for more information on the games, with more details on the announcement below: http://www.colecovision.dk/collectorvision.htm

Pyramid Warp/Battleship Clapton II: http://www.colecovision.dk/coll-warp.htm

Zippy Race: http://www.colecovision.dk/coll-zippy.htm


Hi,

A new game from us! ... ZIPPY RACE for Colecovision

We'll ship ALL copies at the end of February

If you're interested to buy a copy, Send 60$us (Shipping Included) to this Paypal ID: retroillucid@excite

Please specifiy your purchase

Thanks

CollectorVision Team

Comments

Rob Daviau
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Cool! I wonder if the

Cool! I wonder if the creators and fans of Colecovision could of ever imagined new titles so many years later?

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Oldschool games, some people just don't "get it"...

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Bill Loguidice
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Homebrews
Oldschoolgamer wrote:

Cool! I wonder if the creators and fans of Colecovision could of ever imagined new titles so many years later?

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Oldschool games, some people just don't "get it"...

I don't think any of us imagined the possibility for homebrews after our favorite systems died more or less by the mid-80s. What's fascinating are the three systems that happen to lead the way in terms of quality and quantity of homebrews: Atari 2600, Vectrex and ColecoVision. Nevertheless, I think every pre-crash (and many post crash) systems have had a decent number of homebrews, save for (top of my head) the RCA Studio II, Coleco Telstar Arcade, Microvision and Adventurevision, which are all in the "fat chance" category.

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Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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Popularity & Longevity
Bill Loguidice wrote:

I don't think any of us imagined the possibility for homebrews after our favorite systems died more or less by the mid-80s.

I can confirm that for my person, but nobody ever accused me of extreme farsight! ;-)

Back then I thought that my Atari 8-bit would suffice forever and I tinkered with the platform for seven years (I had a 400, a 130XE and a single floppy drive). Then came the Amiga and I was salivating like crazy ("El Gato" animation demo, anyone?) until I had one. Turned out I became more of a user with it and I changed platform after two years (the PC was becoming an even better games machine - at least for me ;-).

With the 16 bit platforms, however, a trend emerged: CPU, RAM and storage expansions made faster and more powerful machines possible!
There aren't too many CPU upgrades for the C64 or the Atari 8-bit platform but later machines lived for a good part on expansion and migration to "better" machines.
Console companies exploited that wish for the next big step, too: Think about the "16/32/64/128" bit machines in their advertising!

Consequence: The platform life span got shorter and shorter! Today it's less than two years for the PC and about four years for consoles until either games run badly or not at all.

Quote:

What's fascinating are the three systems that happen to lead the way in terms of quality and quantity of homebrews: Atari 2600, Vectrex and ColecoVision.

There may be some reasons for that:
- All of these systems use a well known and popular CPU which was in enough other systems to have attracted lots of assembly programmers in the past. Often there's no need to learn a new language - and if one chooses to he has everything at his fingertips.
- Some systems consist of off the shelf parts with official data sheets and documents, others have very well documented custom chips.
- For all systems exist cross-compilers and emulators - in other words: A development tool chain. You don't have to burn a single EPROM to test or distribute your software.

As for the machines:

2600: Because it's so damn different ("riding the beam") and limited (128 bytes of RAM). It's, simply said, a challenge to create something good on it. Which makes those real wonders like Pitfall and Solaris all the more exciting, IMHO.

Vectrex: I don't know too many vector based game machines, do you? ;-)
It's also an all-in-one machine: All machines are identical and fully equipped - the experience is always the same. The 6809 is a very popular CPU, too, but I think this is not of a major factor. Those vectors are.

ColecoVision: The first "best" console after the success of the 2600 was the Intellivision, but it was quite expensive and in some areas it is IMHO not better - or at least not by much. The Coleco is drastically better in nearly all regards (except color count) and has no real flaw. For many it not only promised but delivered "real arcade conversions" for the first time. From todays standpoint the machine does not look very spectacular but back then it was! I suspect that many retro programmers are doing it for nostalgia and not of special interest in it's (few) technical pecularities.

Quote:

Nevertheless, I think every pre-crash (and many post crash) systems have had a decent number of homebrews, save for (top of my head) the RCA Studio II, Coleco Telstar Arcade, Microvision and Adventurevision, which are all in the "fat chance" category.

Some of those systems are quite rare - contrary to the three systems above. In consequence less people have first-hand experience and system information is less readily available - sometimes quite scarce.

The CPUs may not the biggest problem (cross-compilers exist for nearly every CPU architecture, after all) but experienced programmers interested in games programming may not come in high quantities...

The more important question is: Is the tool chain complete? Is there an emulator, preferably with an integrated debugger, available?
No emulator means that you have to run and debug on the real -rare- platform. How many people interested in programming them actually have real hardware?

Homebrewing for them isn't impossible but it's not as comfy as with the more popular platforms and IMHO won't ever attract a "large followship".

New developments occur all the time, though:
http://home.comcast.net/~eichler2/microvision/MicroSimProject.htm

take care,
Calibrator

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Bill Loguidice
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Atari
Calibrator wrote:

2600: Because it's so damn different ("riding the beam") and limited (128 bytes of RAM). It's, simply said, a challenge to create something good on it. Which makes those real wonders like Pitfall and Solaris all the more exciting, IMHO.

Don't forget games like the two Space Shuttle simulators or Pitfall II, the first cartridge I can think of with assistive hardware (other than RAM) in the cartridges to enhance system capabilities.

I think since the Atari 2600 was the first big machine and associated with Atari goes a long, long way. I'm blown away by the power of Batari BASIC, which allows creation of commercial quality games using little more than an enhanced BASIC-style language. Something like that would only be created on what is truly the most popular retro platform.

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Xbox 360: billlog | Wii: 1345 2773 2048 1586 | PS3: ArmchairArcade
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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Do the most with what you have!
Bill Loguidice wrote:

Don't forget games like the two Space Shuttle simulators or Pitfall II, the first cartridge I can think of with assistive hardware (other than RAM) in the cartridges to enhance system capabilities.

Of course, but an added custom chip is a "cheat" when viewed for the "challenge perspective". Except when you designed the chip yourself, of course, like David Crane did for Pitfall II ;-)
(And of course such things were added to prolong the life span of the console and not lessen the challenge at that time)

Quote:

I think since the Atari 2600 was the first big machine and associated with Atari goes a long, long way.

Ack. For many the 2600 is "the" quintessential Atari.

Quote:

I'm blown away by the power of Batari BASIC, which allows creation of commercial quality games using little more than an enhanced BASIC-style language. Something like that would only be created on what is truly the most popular retro platform.

A blurb from their homepage says it all:
"Some may wonder why we like the Atari 2600 so much and why we didn't choose to channel our resources to modern gaming or to a console that wasn't so terribly limited. Maybe we're just masochistic. But we do love the Atari 2600 despite its limitations and find joy in making it do things that the original designers never dreamed possible. Why do people climb mountains? Why do people drive old cars? Why do people collect antiques? I don't know, but if you're reading this, you probably understand."

take care,
Calibrator

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Mark Vergeer
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Would just about any MSX1 game be possible?

Guys, as the MSX1 and Colecovision hardware is so very close in nature, wouldn't just about any MSX1 game be possible on the Coleco?

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Bill Loguidice
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Conversions
Mark Vergeer wrote:

Guys, as the MSX1 and Colecovision hardware is so very close in nature, wouldn't just about any MSX1 game be possible on the Coleco?

Xbox 360: Lactobacillus P | Wii: 8151 3435 8469 3138
Armchair arcade Editor | Pixellator | www.markvergeer.nl

Just about and also the Sega SG-1000, which I believe some of the game conversions are also based on. Those three, the ColecoVision/Adam, Sega SG-1000 and MSX1 are all remarkably similar, and I suppose you could throw in the Spectravideo 318/328 as well. The TI-99/4 and /4a, as well as the Tomy Tutor are close cousins, but just far enough off due to their processors not to be a close enough match for a straightforward conversion.

One of the nice things about these conversions is that additional tweaks are often possible to make the game run smoother or have additional functionality, etc. One example of this is the two player mode in Yie Ar Kung Fu on the ColecoVision, something no other version had.

Vintage Games book!
Xbox 360: billlog | Wii: 1345 2773 2048 1586 | PS3: ArmchairArcade
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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Mark Vergeer
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Love this!

Just love this - would be very cool to compare the 'new' Coleco gameplay with the originial.

Xbox 360: Lactobacillus P | Wii: 8151 3435 8469 3138
Armchair arcade Editor | Pixellator | www.markvergeer.nl

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