Unreleased Coleco ColecoVision/Adam Product Images

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Bill Loguidice
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adamantyr
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Eastern Front
Bill Loguidice wrote:

Were you working from the EF 1941 source code? I was under the impression that most games available via the APX had source code to purchase. I wonder if it's available for that game?

It is, and that's where I got the source code from. It had some comments, but very few. I ended up adding my own line-by-line to describe the ongoing processes. I was working on making a TI-99/4a version of Eastern Front.

I actually got a LOT of the game translated, but the AI was really hard to follow. The 6502 assembly does a lot of stuff that's really just multiplication or division, or doing 16-bit add/subtracts, but it would take a long time of studying it to contextually realize how/why it worked. That made me decide that it would be worth my time to invest in my own game of my own design, rather than try and copy someone else's work.

I also realized that it would be nearly impossible for me to measure the relative closeness to the original since I couldn't really see how/why it worked on the Atari, and couldn't do solid comparisons.

Bill Loguidice
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Stuff
adamantyr wrote:

Wow, impressive stuff. Knowing what I know of the TMS9918a chip, I do wonder how much "action" is actually in the shots; the stills look good but I bet there's not a lot going on.

Most of those are mockups and have nothing to do with reality, sadly, so your assumption is correct. Someone is making that Dracula game a real homebrew and they're coming pretty close to the mockup graphics, which is nice.

adamantyr wrote:

Also, speaking as someone who's tried to translate one program in assembly into another assembly, without comments or high-level explanations of routines, you are really screwed. I tried, TRIED, to figure out what the AI in Chris Crawford's Eastern Front 1941 was doing, to no avail. The code was doing stuff, but I had no idea WHY because of the lack of contextual explanation for how the AI worked, and it made it nearly impossible to translate.

Were you working from the EF 1941 source code? I was under the impression that most games available via the APX had source code to purchase. I wonder if it's available for that game?

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Xbox 360: billlog | Wii: 1345 2773 2048 1586 | PS3: ArmchairArcade
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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adamantyr
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Sweet...

Wow, impressive stuff. Knowing what I know of the TMS9918a chip, I do wonder how much "action" is actually in the shots; the stills look good but I bet there's not a lot going on.

The 99'ers have noticed of late that a lot of the "promised" TI titles of the late '82-83 era were likely planned to be ported from (or to) the Colecovision. In fact, some have speculated it may not be impossible to port Colecovision games over now.

Personally, I don't think so. The Colecovision shares the same video chip as the TI-99/4a, but the processor is totally different in architecture and style. Any code porting/conversion would be inefficient and difficult, requiring a lot of hands-on conversion.

Just as a quick example, the TMS9900 has unsigned multiplication and division operands. This save a LOT of code space since you can quickly do non-base 2 division and multiplication. (The DIV instruction is also noted to have one of the highest cycle counts as well, so using shifting is still viable for speed and ease.) The Z80 doesn't, so they have to write up subroutines to manage such operations, which if directly translated into TMS9900 code would be a total waste of space.

Also, speaking as someone who's tried to translate one program in assembly into another assembly, without comments or high-level explanations of routines, you are really screwed. I tried, TRIED, to figure out what the AI in Chris Crawford's Eastern Front 1941 was doing, to no avail. The code was doing stuff, but I had no idea WHY because of the lack of contextual explanation for how the AI worked, and it made it nearly impossible to translate.

Bill Loguidice
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Speaking of The Sword and the Sorcerer

Speaking of The Sword and the Sorcerer, apparently the long awaited sequel to the 1982 film is in production with the original lead and other fantasy/sci-fi stalwarths. Should be craptacularly cheesy fun. It will be released under the title mentioned at the end credits of the original film, Tales of the Ancient Empire, but is mentioned as a "spiritual sequel" for obvious reasons.

I was a sucker for the badly done 80's fantasy films, so I'm certainly looking forward to it.

Vintage Games book!
Xbox 360: billlog | Wii: 1345 2773 2048 1586 | PS3: ArmchairArcade
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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Bill Loguidice
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Fantasy

I always drooled over this never developed game, even though the movie was mediocre:

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=160607&id=1186488586&l=00c30

This one too. There's just something about what they captured in both visuals that just seem perfect for high fantasy:

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=160583&id=1186488586&l=00c30

It's a shame we never saw them.

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=162238&id=1186488586&l=5fc4f

Vintage Games book!
Xbox 360: billlog | Wii: 1345 2773 2048 1586 | PS3: ArmchairArcade
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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