128K Atari 8-bit Emulating an Apple II?

5 replies [Last post]
Bill Loguidice
Bill Loguidice's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969

Impossible you say? Well, maybe not? http://a2central.com/?p=1596 Hell if I can tell, though, as the site's in Polish...

n/a
Mark Vergeer
Mark Vergeer's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/16/2006
Similar hardware - similar programs running on them?

Amstrad CPC where often modified ZX Spectrum games with the graphic and sound routines changed but to a large extend same code base. Of course those machines were rather similar.



Editor / Pixelator - Armchair Arcade, Inc.
www.markvergeer.nl

n/a
Mark Vergeer
Mark Vergeer's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/16/2006
ZX spectrum emulator on c64

C64 Spectrum 48 (Whitby Computers Ltd.)
1. Emulates Sinclair BASIC only - no Z80 emulation, so no machine code programs work. Microdrive emulated via 1541/1571 disk drive.
2. Loads Microdrive files from disk.
3. Saves Microdrive files to disk.
4. No real tape support.
5. Requires just a basic C64.
6. Slow - well, it is just BASIC and it is on a C64!
7. Freeware?
8. Allows C64 users to see some of the superiority of Sinclair's masterpiece (well you try and think of a good point!). And Sinclair BASIC is somewhat more useful than Commodore's attempt.
9. Useless for all but the most BASIC of games (pun intended).
10. Some information from Adam Roach's comp.emulators.misc FAQ.
11. Available from World of Spectrum (ZIPped up .P00 file for use with the PC64 CBM 64 emulator).



Editor / Pixelator - Armchair Arcade, Inc.
www.markvergeer.nl

n/a
Mark Vergeer
Mark Vergeer's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/16/2006
I am not sure if this is a hoax....

The Polish text that they link to to a large extend describes how the emulator has surfaced with number 0.8!! and that it was a large surprise for everybody. Then some history of the Apple II and how expensive it was in the day (costing 2638 dolarów), describing what processor it has, how fast it runs and the screen resolution (48KB! Architektura komputera oparta by?a na solidnym procesorze MOS 6502, taktowanym 1 MHz. Jab?uszko potrafi?o wy?wietli? obraz o rozdzielczo?ci 280 na 192 piksele w 6 kolorach. ) They talk about the differences in memory. Then they say something about the emulator itself...
Something about the Apple II being inferior to the Atari. Something about thought on using data compression techniques. I thing it is some sort of program that allows the Apple II to run two adventure programs 'The Hobbit' and 'Mystery House' that were originally intended for the Atari.

So I am not sure if this is a hoax. I remember a working program on the C64 that emulated a 16/48K Sinclair spectrum. It even was able to load basic programs from tape and loading screens. It also provided some peek and poke functionality. The whole thing was a basic interpretor with some machine specific peeks and pokes emulated and the screen output emulated.
It was quite good at running basic programs though. I remember MrCustard and I tested it out quite extensively. So if 'basic' is emulated and screen calls are translated into native Apple II calls I can image it working in some form. You could write a lay-over replacement bios that is loaded from disk that to a large extend enables the Apple II hardware to function like an Atari from the 'programs point of view'. I can actually see this working on some level. Of course the Atari's graphics chips is way more advanced but I wouldn't be surprised if a really smart Polish guys has managed to do something like that. It is quite easy to hijack the regular 'user experience' on those old 8 bit computers by adding in some of your own routines actually expanding the basic operation of those machines. If it just caters for two games it could be possible by hijacking the specific function calls and translating them into native Apple II ones.



Editor / Pixelator - Armchair Arcade, Inc.
www.markvergeer.nl

n/a
Bill Loguidice
Bill Loguidice's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
Peer Emulation
Rowdy Rob wrote:

I don't care if you plug in 10 GIGS (or MORE!) of RAM into an Atari 8-bit, you're not going to be able to effectively emulate an Apple II. The main reason is the graphics display; as "Calibrator" very effectively explained in the "Pinball Construction Set" thread, the Apple II handles graphics very differently than the Atari 8-bit (or C-64).

If the emulator does work in any fashion, it would have to run VERY SLOWLY. Both were based off of the 6502 processor, so the Atari would have to run "emulator" code on top of the 6502 machine code. Needless to say, it would be very slow.

qoj hpmoj o+ 6uo73q 3Jv 3svq jnoh 77V

Oh absolutely, but unless it's a hoax (apparently not), it must do SOMETHING. I would think one of the most likely candidates for 1:1 emulation (meaning emulating a peer) would be the Coleco Adam with the Apple II, simply because both BASIC's are very similar. You could put the emulation code in the upper 16K and leave 48K left for emulating the Apple II side.

Obviously we've had a real-world example of peer emulation when in the Atari Flashback 1, a NES-on-a-chip was used to "emulate" an Atari 7800 and 2600. Badly. But it did it.



Wii: 1345 2773 2048 1586 | PS3: ArmchairArcade
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.

n/a
Rowdy Rob
Rowdy Rob's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/04/2006
Not possible.

I don't care if you plug in 10 GIGS (or MORE!) of RAM into an Atari 8-bit, you're not going to be able to effectively emulate an Apple II. The main reason is the graphics display; as "Calibrator" very effectively explained in the "Pinball Construction Set" thread, the Apple II handles graphics very differently than the Atari 8-bit (or C-64).

If the emulator does work in any fashion, it would have to run VERY SLOWLY. Both were based off of the 6502 processor, so the Atari would have to run "emulator" code on top of the 6502 machine code. Needless to say, it would be very slow.

qoj hpmoj o+ 6uo73q 3Jv 3svq jnoh 77V

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.