Paladins Legacy

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yakumo9275's picture

The author of a Tandy Coco RPG, Paladin's Legacy has made it available.

Check out http://paladinslegacy.spaces.live.com/

Check it out;

Title Screen
Paladins Legacy Title ScreenPaladins Legacy Title Screen

Dungeon
Paladins Legacy DungeonPaladins Legacy Dungeon

Stats
Paladins Legacy StatsPaladins Legacy Stats

Comments

Matt Barton
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Ah, I see what you mean.

Ah, I see what you mean. However, I think that'd be SERIOUSLY putting the cart before the horse!! LOL, I would definitely want to make sure I could make a decent game before spending hundreds of dollars on this stuff. I figure just making something for Windows would be a good way to start with minimal cash needed.

If in the unlikely event I ever did have a hit on my hands, I could always pay the extra for the Xbox 360 support, right?

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Mark Vergeer
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Hmmm - okay so it's cross development

Didn't think I could cross compile it for both X360 AND the PC. That is very interesting indeed! Okay guys, let's quit being 'users' and become devvers!

Xbox 360: Lactobacillus P | Wii: 8151 3435 8469 3138
Armchair arcade Editor | Pixellator | www.markvergeer.nl

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chaneya (not verified)
Developing in C# and XNA

Yes the beauty of the whole XNA thing is that you can develop one code base and it will run on PC, 360 and now with the release of XNA 3.0, the Zune. This means you can stage your development. For instance, you can do all of your learning and startup development on the PC. It's all completely free to develop on PC including the Visual Studio C# Express 2008 and XNA 3.0 framework. Then once you have something worth real consderation, you can pay the $99 Creator's Club fee, get your key code for 360 deployment and deploy your work to your Xbox 360. Then you can play your game on your 360 at home and further debug it and even continue to develop it live on your PC. The way it works is your 360 and PC communicate over your home network. So as you make updates in Visual Studio C# Express 2008, and run it, it runs on your 360. When I get to that point, I'll probably move my 360 in the same room as my PC. You can have all three projects (360, PC and Zune) in the same Solution/Folder. All of the PC code is copied for you when you click convert to 360 and you have both a PC and a 360 project code base in the same solution. Although the code is cross-platform, there are a few considerations you have to make. For instance, different input controls and screen resolutions. (ie. 360 joystick controls on 360, Keyboard on PC, circle pad on Zune.) All TV's have overscan so it helps to consider these things as you develop on the PC. Your base resolution if you plan to deploy to 360 should be 1280 X 720. Make sure any HUD or text elements are contained within the middle 80% of the screen to accomodate TV overscan. There's a bunch of stuff like that that are just differences in platforms. But all of the code is transferable.

If you go to http://creators.xna.com/en-US/ the creators club website, it's all there. There is a best practices LOGO on the front page that discusses stuff you need to consider for the 360.

It's a lot to take in. The other thing that really impressed me with XNA is the vast amount of tutorials and available code on the internet. There's an XNA wiki, Ziggyware has hundreds of tutorials, and of course the Creator's Club website has a very large educaiton catalog including a full RPG, Racing game, space shooter, 2D platforming game etc. all free for commercial use.

I run into road blocks all of the time and I just google XNA whatever, and I usualy find dozens of code examples that help me out.

It's funny but one of my first hurdles was a personal one. I had to get over the fact that I would be using other's code in my project. In the old days, you only had your own code. There was no where else to get any code. But now the motto seems to be why recreate the wheel and Let's share!. .NET and XNA by their very nature are about reusing existing code. With XNA all you are doing is tapping into the .NET library of code and using someone elses code, in this case Microsoft's. But without that library, development would be impossible. XNA is just an extension of .NET that focuses solely on game creation and makes access to DirectX easy (sorry that's a lie...it's easier than C++ and DirectX native but it's not easy) using C# as your language.

Allan

Rowdy Rob
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Using other's code
chaneya wrote:

It's funny but one of my first hurdles was a personal one. I had to get over the fact that I would be using other's code in my project. In the old days, you only had your own code. There was no where else to get any code. But now the motto seems to be why recreate the wheel and Let's share!. .NET and XNA by their very nature are about reusing existing code. With XNA all you are doing is tapping into the .NET library of code and using someone elses code, in this case Microsoft's. But without that library, development would be impossible. XNA is just an extension of .NET that focuses solely on game creation and makes access to DirectX easy (sorry that's a lie...it's easier than C++ and DirectX native but it's not easy) using C# as your language.

How does using other people's code figure in when you want to sell your game? Certainly there'd have to be some sort of "kickback" to the original authors of the code?

Also, apparently you have no choice but to SELL your game on XBox Live if you want to distrubute your game on the 360 platform; if I understand correctly, you can't release it as freeware.

I must say, skimming through my XNA book and looking at web code, C# looks pretty intimidating, at least compared to Basic! I'm still going to give it a go, though.

qoj hpmoj o+ 6uo73q 3Jv 3svq jnoh 77V

chaneya (not verified)
Using Other's code

When I'm referring to other's code I'm talking about the thousands of tutorials that people have released for XNA and even more impressive, the Education catalog available at Microsoft's Creator's Club Website. The code available in tutorials on the web is no different than code you would pull out of a book you purchase on XNA. This includes the variable quality of that code. Unless the author says otherwise, that code is available for you to use as you want. But what is more impressive is the Microsoft released code. That code is very professional and in some cases very very advanced as you can imagine. But again you can do whatever you want with the code, commercial or otherwise. This includes the full games they have provided for free. There is code for a fully realized RPG, Racing game, space ware game, Platformer etc.. In my case, I was really impressed with their 2D particle system. I'm using that code and if I ever get something worth selling, I will sell my project with that code included. If you look at the community games already available on 360, you can see that particle system being used in many games. In some cases, the author didn't even bother changing the texture used for the explosion. And that doesn't matter. (My main point though was that by programming in XNA you are using a library of existing code just like if you were programming for windows using the .NET library.) that code is all free to use and of course MS wants you to use it because it ties you to their platform. Same as if you use Directx. It took me some getting used to that idea.

Relative to pricing, it is my opinion that MS is really out of touch with what they need to do to gain the community games platform the mass exposure it needs. They do not have a free option nor do they have a .25, .50 .99 option. That's a huge mistake. I've tried several times posting my concerns on the Creator's Club website forum but the moderates block my posting before it even gets posted. The sad fact is most of the community games right now on the 360 really really suck....bad. They are not worth anything. They should be free. But the minimum charge has to be $2. If your game is over 50 megs it has to be $4 or 8$. MS has not yet released any sales data on community games. They say sales data will come out in March. Since they just recently increased the trial time from 4 minutes to 8 minutes, I think that's an early indicator that sales are not going well. It just does not make when you consider these are casual games of questionable quality. Comparing to the iPhone App store where there are 1000s of free games and apps and of course many for .99, MS is really out of touch on their pricing model. I think they will figure it out but it's unfortunate that they wait until the data tells them what seems obvious to everyone else.

chaneya (not verified)
Publishing your code

I forgot to mention one other thing. With XNA 3.0, in my opinion, XNA finally became a mature development system. For instance, there is One Click publishing now. With one click, my code will compile, package into a installable .exe with all supporitng files. I can zip that and send it to anyone. They download it and unzip it. All they have to do is double click the .exe and it runs a built in installer to their PC. It detects weather or not they have .Net and will ask them to download it if they do not. It also does the standard DirectX check and downloads that if needed. I does everything for you.

Pretty neat.
Allan

Mark Vergeer
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Joined: 01/16/2006
GL basic has gotten my attention too

Especially the cross platform aspect of it and that it caters for the gp2x, which in my opinion still is a great plaform for home devving. No doubt the Pandora will be getting a GL basic version too!

Xbox 360: Lactobacillus P | Wii: 8151 3435 8469 3138
Armchair arcade Editor | Pixellator | www.markvergeer.nl

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chaneya (not verified)
Question about Dark Basic

Does anyone one know anything about Dark Basic? My brother became interested in that until I told him about XNA. I don't really know much about it. My only concern is if the language is not Object Oriented, I guess I don't see the point in learning it.

Rowdy Rob
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Joined: 09/04/2006
Dark Basic is not Object Oriented.
chaneya wrote:

Does anyone one know anything about Dark Basic? My brother became interested in that until I told him about XNA. I don't really know much about it. My only concern is if the language is not Object Oriented, I guess I don't see the point in learning it.

I'm no DB programmer, but my understanding is that it is not OO, it is procedural. I've read that "BlitzMax" is an OOP language, but I didn't follow up on that to be sure.

qoj hpmoj o+ 6uo73q 3Jv 3svq jnoh 77V

Bill Loguidice
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Joined: 12/31/1969
Yeah, I'm with Rob. I would

Yeah, I'm with Rob. I would avoid anything that's so learning intensive that's not a cross compiler. BlitzMax is a good choice since you can compile on both Mac and PC. I like GameMaker because it's very straigthforward click and place and also allows for more advanced manual scripting, even though it's PC only (a fair trade-off in my opinion). The programs from ClickTeam are also rather nice.

Frankly, I'd look at all the options and weigh it against time-to-learn and what you want to do. If you just want to casually get down to the business of making games without devoting huge chunks of time to learning something that you may never get the hang sufficiently anyway, then certainly something like GameMaker or the ClickTeam products are a fine choice. You can then decide if you'd rather step up to something like BlitzMax or GLBasic. From there I'd say you'd have to think long and hard about stepping up to XNA or C sharp. Ideally, we'd all learn the most advanced languages, but the reality is it really does require intensive study to become reasonably proficient with them and there's a good chance that some of us, such as myself, would never be able to learn it on their own anyway.

So personally I'd look long at hard at your own inherent talents (good at math and analytical thinking, for instance), motivations and time, and decide which of the three tiers make the most sense. What's nice is that ANY of the three tiers can create a professional quality game.

Vintage Games book!
Xbox 360: billlog | Wii: 1345 2773 2048 1586 | PS3: ArmchairArcade
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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