Dungeons and Dragons 4th Edition

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yakumo9275
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So, who has taken a look at DnD4E? I've briefly gone through the 3 core books, but am really waiting for the first set of errata printings (about 6months) before I buy them myself.

This really feels like the first whole WoTC produced version, 3/3.5 still felt like left over TSR stuff.

Its interesting and I believe a step in the right direction. Personally I advocate Tunnels and Trolls, and this feels much closer to TnT than DnD. Hey, its trying to put the fun back in, something flying buffalo did in the 70's. I guess you can turn a ship around, it just takes 30 odd years.

The Keep on the Shadowfell H1 is impressive I think, but poor QA on the printing tho, smudging ink, the back cover of the module has info so you cant hold it up and read it as your players will see all the good stuff etc.. oddities. Smudging ink is a real shame, I like to keep things as "mint" as I can.

I did like the new monsterous manual, but it always annoys me they dont make one giant one, so I expect to see another 5 volumes as the years progress.

I like the direction its going but Ive never been sold on the whole miniature thing.

Anyone played H1 yet? thoughts?
Anyone DM'd the new 4E stuff?

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MazinKaesar
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I like it...

But we still use an ibrid set of rules, part AD&D 2nd ed, part DnD 3ed.
We have so much time to play (2-3 gaming sessions/year), so we use "light" custom rules ;)

---
My avatar? Just an abstract of my life ^^

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yakumo9275
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Hey Adam, thanks for the

Hey Adam, thanks for the analysis. I probably wont ever play a 4E game, but I do like reading the rulebooks, gives me insights for my roguelike and crpgs to see how they balance things and such.

When I did Cyberpunk 2020 / BGC it was always in the "{character name} does this" mold.

-- Stu --

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Matt Barton
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Yeah, I can tell just from

Yeah, I can tell just from reading these posts that it takes a substantial time investment to really get going with these games. I had the chance to play a game with some friends of the family a year or two ago and was really impressed with the interactivity. Everyone had a great time. There are some groups here that have invited me to play with them, but I keep thinking only of the time investment. Hate to have yet another commitment, and it's hard for me to commit weekends to something. I really should bite the bullet and give it a whirl. Heck, I might really like the guys and make some new friends.

I'm kinda with Bill on the role playing part. As much as I respect that, it always seems forced when I try to do it. It's a little easier in muds and what-not where you're just typing, but trying to effect an accent and so on seems hard. I could probably do it with enough practice and if I felt really comfortable with the character.

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adamantyr
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Speaking in character

In the games I've played in and ran, most of us say "I". Not because we're in character, but because our characters are really just an avatar of us.

Sometimes you get the one fellow who's really into portraying his character "properly", and they sometimes slip and refer to them in the 3rd person. I don't have a problem with this, though, the game's purpose is to relax and have fun, whether you're playing "someone else" or just a avatar of yourself in the game.

Tabletop roleplaying's greatest strength is the power of interactivity; the ability of the players to influence the story through interaction with each other and the DM. There is NO computer game that can do this.

Bill Loguidice
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Styles of playing D&D

I'm curious how you guys play. When I used to play, I preferred the "my character is going to do this" method of playing rather than the "I'm going to do this" method. In other words, instead of pretending to be the character, I would "guide" my character in the world. To me, play acting felt forced and awkward, while I felt more immersed doing it the other way. That's just me though...



Wii: 1345 2773 2048 1586 | PS3: ArmchairArcade
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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adamantyr
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4th Edition D&D

I ran a game of it this past weekend. My brother's been running it since it came out, and I wanted him to have a chance to play.

Both of us were weary of the hang-ups in 3rd edition, enough that playing was an effort. Prestige classes were a nice idea on paper, but in practice they created horrifically imbalanced characters. And while 3rd edition was a much cleaner and easier to run rules-set than 1st edition, it had a lot of the same problems. The sheer flexibility of wizards and clerics made them the uber-classes; the adding of feats and extra abilities to other classes helped mitigate this somewhat, but not enough. Being able to create magic items was also a problem; it illustrated the amusing truth that clerics are always going to be better at it than wizards, since they can have any spell with a day's notice and most of the buff spells required for items were in their lists. This also lead to players manufacturing tons of scrolls and potions in-between adventures, a lot of wasted game time. Also, the game started to break down past a certain level, and the epic-level rules NEVER worked right, particularly the spell system. And finally, the 3rd edition rules still had a simulationist paradigm. Everything has to be represented. The NPC classes are a good example of this; a fine idea on the surface, but underneath, it's basically telling the DM he has to make characters for everyone. It also feeds a trend I've seen, especially with orphaned campaign settings, of DM's who do nothing but world design work, and never actually PLAY.

Concerning 4th edition, in short, I like it. Adding a couple "monster" races to the player's handbook is welcome; it answers a need for players to play something distinctly not human. The classes are now casted in specific roles; this makes it a lot easier on the players and DM alike to create a balanced party, and recognize where weaknesses are in one lacking one of each type. Opponents argue that roles were always in the game, the trick is though that the rules NEVER acknowledged it, until now. By defining every class in the same style (powers, with at-will, encounter, or daily types) it makes it easier to play any class.

Thing is, a lot of these changes really don't become apparent until you play the game. I've seen plenty of forum trolls blasting the game, but on a whole, they seem to be mostly DM's, not players, and very few actually played it before forming their opinions. So don't let anyone tell you it's bad or good, try it yourself first.

If you read the Penny Arcade or PvP comics, you may be interested to know that Wizards brought the three comic strip guys (Jerry, Mike, and Scott) together to play a 4th Edition game, and recorded it as they did so. You can listen to the podcasts, and look at some entertaining comic strips they did based on it, on Dragon's website. You'll have to create a login to download them. They're very entertaining, and worth listening to.

Bill Loguidice
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New Rev

I'm fascinated by it, but not into it anymore for a variety of reasons these days. Let us know how it goes!



Wii: 1345 2773 2048 1586 | PS3: ArmchairArcade
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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