Gates of Delirium Live - Post 13

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BL: Welcome to yakumo9275's (Stu) ongoing "Gates of Delirium Live" recounting of his play through this obscure Computer Role Playing Game for the Radio Shack TRS-80 Color Computer, released in 1987 from Diecom. Post 13:

OK, So I found my last key, hidden on level 2 of the movable wall dungeon, in the south east corner is a wall you can walk through, and back there is the missing key! I knew that painful dungeon had to be of some use.

Missing KeyMissing Key

With this key I the wed.. no wait, I invoke 'U'se the "Gate Key" and the lock vanishes....

I step toward the jazzy text

The titular textThe titular text

and as I step up, the game ends and the final screen is shown and the game sits in a loop that you cant break out of.

I WIN!!!I WIN!!!

which reads;

Quote:

Congratulations
You have solved
The Gates of Delirium

The Secret Messages are:

Line 1 : THERE ARE TWO WORLDS
Line 2 : CODE #1 02676600205365
Line 3 : I SOLVED THE GATES
Line 4 : CODE #2 04052318022519

Grimjack sits back contentedly. Yes the magic if the gates is now known and wouldnt it be super cool if Diecom would send me a spanking new CoCo3 for completing the game (assuming nobody solved the game... cough)... and winning their contest..

There will be one final wrap up post of thoughts and things and a more organised type walkthrough.

Comments

adamantyr
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Woot!

Congratulations!

One thing you may consider doing, if it's not too onerous, is to write up a walk-through/guide for anyone else who wants to "solve the gates". I wouldn't blame you if you'd care not to dwell on it, though.

Calibrator
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Wouldn't it be super-cool...

...if the game actually had an ending? ;-)

But, really, this is completely fitting to the rest of the "game":
Painfully search each crevice for a special key, use them, the end.

No wonder that Richard Garriott never took notice.

take care,
Calibrator

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Bill Loguidice
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The End?
Calibrator wrote:

...if the game actually had an ending? ;-)

But, really, this is completely fitting to the rest of the "game":
Painfully search each crevice for a special key, use them, the end.

No wonder that Richard Garriott never took notice.

take care,
Calibrator

I'm searching for the right word... Perhaps "sterile" is a good one to describe the game? It seems like it's missing any signs of "life" (personality?). The ending seemed to only reinforce that.



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Mark Vergeer
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Thank god I didn't play the game myself

This end is just totally an anticlimax - I would be very disappointed, thank god Grimjack has another opinion.
What surprises me is love of specific types of RPG around the world. Americans seem to focus on building their party/troups with a high regard to stats. The statistics even seem to outweigh the story that is often obscured due to the raw interface and numbers on the screen.
Asian RPGs focus on the story, often nice cutscenes or demo-like intros are used. And of course stats do matter but in the execution of the game it serves more of a purpose in the battles. It drives that interaction and gaining experience. Asian RPGs seem less static and more adaptive to the player.
Both originate from slightly different eras where game play was influenced by technical limitations to a greater and lesser extent. Anyways, Europeans never caught on to the stat-intensive US-style RPGs which do leave a lot to the imagination of the player with the sparse graphics. In Europe RPGs Asian style are more accepted and played. Correct me if I am wrong ;-P



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www.markvergeer.nl

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Bill Loguidice
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Comparisons
Mark Vergeer wrote:

This end is just totally an anticlimax - I would be very disappointed, thank god Grimjack has another opinion.
What surprises me is love of specific types of RPG around the world. Americans seem to focus on building their party/troups with a high regard to stats. The statistics even seem to outweigh the story that is often obscured due to the raw interface and numbers on the screen.
Asian RPGs focus on the story, often nice cutscenes or demo-like intros are used. And of course stats do matter but in the execution of the game it serves more of a purpose in the battles. It drives that interaction and gaining experience. Asian RPGs seem less static and more adaptive to the player.
Both originate from slightly different eras where game play was influenced by technical limitations to a greater and lesser extent. Anyways, Europeans never caught on to the stat-intensive US-style RPGs which do leave a lot to the imagination of the player with the sparse graphics. In Europe RPGs Asian style are more accepted and played. Correct me if I am wrong ;-P

The only thing I'd want to add is a personal clarification. (I'll use your terms) The story is important to "American RPGs", but since the player is free to play his character or characters pretty much as he or she sees fit, it can't necessarily be as tightly integrated or as intricately woven as an "Asian RPG". Asian RPGs are more rigid and linear. The big downside to me of those games is that you have 100 players of an "Asian RPG", they more or less have the same story to tell, as progressing through the game triggers the same exact plot points/cut scenes/etc. You have 100 players of an "American RPG" and they'll more or less have a different story to tell, usually being able to approach the game's events in a different manner.

To me, being able to create your own character (or preferably characters to make up a party), play the game in your own way and get a different experience (i.e., unique to you) from someone else who plays the game, always makes "American RPGs" of the classic variety a far superior game playing experience. With that said, I think "Asian RPGs" are a different genre of game than classic "American RPGs", so the comparison is not entirely a fair one (it's a bit like if I compared an Infocom text adventure to a Sierra adventure game--there are many parallels, but they don't deliver the same experience).



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Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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MazinKaesar
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wow

Well, the ending is not so beatiful, but the game itself seems really nice. I'll try someday ^^

BTW, what are those "Secrete Messages"??? O_o

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Bill Loguidice
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Perception
MazinKaesar wrote:

Well, the ending is not so beautiful, but the game itself seems really nice. I'll try someday ^^

The game itself seems really nice?! Have you been reading the same chronicle as we have? ;-)



Wii: 1345 2773 2048 1586 | PS3: ArmchairArcade
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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yakumo9275
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prizes
MazinKaesar wrote:

Well, the ending is not so beatiful, but the game itself seems really nice. I'll try someday ^^

BTW, what are those "Secrete Messages"??? O_o

The secret messages were for a competition. The company announced when they released the game, if whomever completes it first and mails in the message wins a new CoCo3 (remember this came out for coco2).. That was a huge prize back then.

-- Stu --

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