Political elections

6 replies [Last post]
Matt Barton
Matt Barton's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/16/2006

This is Off-Topic, but I am very curious about who you're supporting in the upcoming presidential election. On the Democratic side, we have Obama and Clinton. Republicans have McCain. I've been trying to track Nader; apparently, he is running, though his campaign seems to be very low key at this point.

I must admit I've been most impressed with Obama, but I am worried that his race will cause him to lose. So many people can't see past it, especially in the south. I am a fan of Nader's going way back, but would like to see him gathering more support before committing to him.

I'm not sure about McCain, but he seems to be more appealing than Bush, at least to me. I like his sense of humor.

FYI, I set up this page for my students as a class project. If you want to chip in there, please feel free.

n/a
Mark Vergeer
Mark Vergeer's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/16/2006
It helped Bush :-(

Matt, I can totally understand, I would probably vote Green or Democrat or minority party as well but with the note that it would be out of principle. Like you state about your choice for Nader.

From what I have learned from politics - especially multi party systems - I can tell you that you'll always help out the more powerful candidate/party in the end when you vote for the minority party. But I wouldn't recommend strategic voting, this often results in less of a difference between those that still have a winning chance. But it is what a lot of people around the world do - vote strategically and thus causing pollution within the voting system. Diluting differences and results.

To all I say vote for the candidate you want to end up being the next president of the US. For me it could not possibly be a republican, the way things are forced out in such a black and white manner.



Editor / Pixelator - Armchair Arcade, Inc.
www.markvergeer.nl

n/a
Matt Barton
Matt Barton's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/16/2006
McCain

I'm with you, Mark. The binary stuff is just plain stupid. I really, really wish we had a viable third party in the US. I am a member of the Green Party for that very reason. However, people seem to enjoy the labels and matching the stereotypes. If somebody tries to force me into an either/or choice, I always want a third option. It doesn't bother me if it's not as popular.

Then again, I voted for Nader in the Gore/Bush election, and I wonder if that might have helped Bush more than it helped Nader.

n/a
Mark Vergeer
Mark Vergeer's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/16/2006
Non Voter - outside view

The almost binary-choice involved in US-elections is daunting. When it comes to solving the world's solutions and choices in political parties/political programs that is a little scary to say the least! Is it really just a choice between good and bad? Right and wrong? Make the other candidate look bad? What always surprises me is the air of personal vendettas and mud slinging that surrounds US presidential elections. The 'person' seems to be more important than the political program during the campaigns. I like what Hillary tried to do for the US health care system way way back. She has a lengthy political career which is a bit longer and she has more merits to her name than Obama has. Both Clinton and Obama are political sly animals trying to play on the sentiments of the public.

I for one would applaud a black man becoming the next US president! Sure he will of course have something up his sleeve but so will Hillary.
I would also applaud a woman becoming the next US president! Women are powerful thinkers, strategists and leaders - a powerful woman at the top might be something the US/This World needs.

I applaud a politician who dares to say that the availability of (hand)guns / the right to bear arms are the cause of a lot of violence and accidental deaths in youths and not some video-game where pixellated blood is spilled. When the gun is there - there is a higher likelihood it is going to be used in some way. If it is not - well I don't have to go on right?
I applaud a politician who dares to say that some things in life and I especially mean basic needs like medicare and schooling should be available to all and not the happy few.

No doubt a lot of folk will just shrug and think nothing of the scribblings of a Dutch citizen, a country where pot is readily available and all 'Amsterdam mers' are dope-heads, we all wear wooden clogs and a little boy keeps the land from overflowing by keeping his finger in the hole of a dike. ;-P

Thank god I am not faced with the option to choose between the two. I can just sit back, relax and see what happens. I am curious to see which state will become the deciding factor in the 49%/51% 50%/50% outcome these elections will no doubt end up in.



Editor / Pixelator - Armchair Arcade, Inc.
www.markvergeer.nl

n/a
Bill Loguidice
Bill Loguidice's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
Three Quality Choices...

I've always been a fan of both Hillary's and McCain's. However, I disagree with McCain's Iraq stance, so I have to give the nod to Hillary. I think Obama is a dramatic speaker and would be a good American face to present to the outside world, which would help heal a lot of damage Bush and company have caused. Overall, though, I'm fine with any of the three, but I'd have to go with Hillary if given a choice.

If Obama does in fact pull out the Democratic nomination as it seems he has a good chance of doing and it's Obama versus McCain, it will be a very tough call for me. Right now I'd say I'd probably vote for Obama, again mostly over McCain's Iraq stance, but I'd certainly keep an open mind after seeing how some of the other positions line up.

By the way, I'm listening to Carl Bernstein's "A Woman in Charge" on my phone (unabridged) and I've certainly gained even more appreciation for Clinton. I hope to do the same for the other two candidates...

As for Nader and some of the other independent-type individuals running for President? I would love the idea of at least one more legitimate option rather than the ridiculous two party system American politics have denigrated into, but those guys aren't it (and frankly Nader's age is a huge turnoff at this point). If Perot hadn't gone wacko in '92, we could have had a legitimate third party by now. As it is, it's politics as usual.



Wii: 1345 2773 2048 1586 | PS3: ArmchairArcade
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.

n/a
Matt Barton
Matt Barton's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/16/2006
huckabee

My grandparents (who were Bush supporters) went with Huckabee, too, and they're in Louisiana. I'm afraid to say that Obama will never attract most white southerners; they'd be more likely to vote for Clinton but most will probably end up in the McCain camp. Then again, the black voters were really mobilizing; if they really get organized and go to the polls on election day, they may very outnumber the whites and turn some traditionally red states blue. However, that's a big "if." The poverty, disillusionment, cynicism, and so on will have their effects.

I'm not sure if Obama is really being vague or if that's just the way the media is trying to paint him. He seems pretty clear on certain issues, such as being willing to talk to certain countries and voting against the war. He also seems the most sincere about campaign reform. I'll admit, I favored Edwards strongly until he dropped out, and that was because he was really going after the corporations.

n/a
yakumo9275
yakumo9275's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/26/2006
aint nobody taking my

aint nobody taking my guns!

wait. thats not the question.

mm I'm not allowed to vote (green card n all). Obama won plenty down here in the south (shock! large black population in the south!).

Hilliary is sly, but I feel obama has a hidden agenda of some kind. cant put my finger on it but I get an odd vibe. He has not released enough info on his policies and such to my mind.

Im not particularly a fan of anyone. They are afterall, politicians and you cant please everyone. I just dislike the sheer amount of religious dogma that pervades US politics and policy. Too many knee jerk topics take control (abortion, etc) as opposed to running the country (jobs, the economy, etc). Too much federal / state interferance.

my wife, who can vote is going obama's way. my inlaws went with huckabee so I dont know who they are leaning towards now.

-- Stu --

n/a

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.