Do you feel that you're physically fit?

Matt Barton's picture
Yes, I'm in great shape.
33% (2 votes)
I need to lose some weight.
50% (3 votes)
I'm too skinny.
17% (1 vote)
I've got a serious weight problem.
0% (0 votes)
I don't care about how I look.
0% (0 votes)
Total votes: 6

Comments

Bill Loguidice
Bill Loguidice's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
Cheat day versus daily cheat
Matt Barton wrote:

Thanks for the info, Mark and Bill. It sounds like I'm doing okay with my cup of coffee in the morning and the occasional cup of tea. I am trying to drink more water, and I'm not that crazy about soda for it to be a problem. I do have a weakness for beer and alcohol, though, particularly beer. I'm a huge fan of import and microbrews. Kicking that habit completely is going to be very tough. That plan mentioned earlier gives you Sunday as a "eat/drink whatever" day, so I might work on cutting out the beer except on Sat or Sun (probably Sat).

I used to subscribe to the "cheat day" theory, but actually am more inclined to rely on the more recent suggestion that having a day to be "totally bad" on your diet (including drinking in your case) is the wrong approach versus enjoying yourself a little each day (in other words, a treat-a-day). The original idea with the "cheat day" was that if you were good for the six out of seven days, you could eat (again, or drink) like crap on that off day and it wouldn't metabolize in time for it to really have an impact on your body. In fact, it has recently been shown that a single day splurge can set you back quite a bit more than previously thought. It's probably healthier, more psychologically sound and ultimately more enjoyable (after all, most of us feel like crap after a gorging even though it feels good when doing it) to have "one a day". In actuality and looking at it logically, that seems to make sense to me...

======================================
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director
Armchair Arcade, Inc.
======================================

n/a
Matt Barton
Matt Barton's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/16/2006
Drinks

Thanks for the info, Mark and Bill. It sounds like I'm doing okay with my cup of coffee in the morning and the occasional cup of tea. I am trying to drink more water, and I'm not that crazy about soda for it to be a problem. I do have a weakness for beer and alcohol, though, particularly beer. I'm a huge fan of import and microbrews. Kicking that habit completely is going to be very tough. That plan mentioned earlier gives you Sunday as a "eat/drink whatever" day, so I might work on cutting out the beer except on Sat or Sun (probably Sat).

n/a
Mark Vergeer
Mark Vergeer's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/16/2006
Caffeïne....

Caffeïne rush - caffeïne has stimulatory properties on bowel movements, it can also cause increased perspiration and increased heart rate. It has been known to cause palpitations and sleeplessness. Not the most wonderful food ingredient you think.
But it has good properties aswell as it can cease an asthma attack! Quite handy to known if people with asthma don't have their medication with them and are suffering from an attack.

Highly refined sugars and other foodstuffs are generally bad for you. Soda's generally contain that in large quantities. So Bill's right to stay away from soda. ;-)



Editor / Pixelator - Armchair Arcade, Inc.

n/a
Bill Loguidice
Bill Loguidice's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
Tea and Coffee

A lot of people who workout, bodybuilders included, drink copious amounts of Diet Coke and/or coffee. This is partly for flavor over water and fewer calories and carbs over other types of drinks. Mostly though, it's for the caffeine rush. In my mind, you reach a point of diminishing returns fairly quickly. The more caffeine you consume, you the more you need to consume to feel any notable or longer lasting effect. As for teas, depending upon the type, there can be some positive ingredients and nutrients, not to mention anti-oxidants, which are critical to a healthy body.

In my opinion, as long as you're not drinking your calories to excess, it's probably OK since despite the contradictory reports, the aforementioned many trainees - many of whom are quite successful - certainly imbibe, as long as you keep in mind excessive caffeine (caffeine has positive metabolic benefits, but against, within reason). The purer a drink is, frankly, in my mind, the better it is. I certainly never touch soda because of that (and also because I can't do carbonation). I mostly stick to water, milk, juice and teas, with the occasional sweetened non-carbonated beverage (and sometimes a hot cocoa). I never touch alcohol, coffee or soda.

======================================
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director
Armchair Arcade, Inc.
======================================

n/a
Matt Barton
Matt Barton's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/16/2006
Coffee and Tea

Hi, guys. All this talk has definitely gotten me motivated to get more serious about dieting and exercise, but I have another question. What about coffee and tea? I did some searching online and came up with contradicting responses.

I know that adding sugar and cream to these things makes them bad for you, but I always drink my coffee black with no sugar. I have been drinking about a half gallon of sweet tea per day, but eliminated that and replaced it with water. However, I'm still wondering if black/unsweet coffee and unsweet herbal teas is wrecking my diet.

Is it "bad" to drink two cups of black/unsweet coffee in the morning and perhaps a few cups of unsweetened herbal teas at night? What kind of impact is this having?

n/a
Rowdy Rob
Rowdy Rob's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/04/2006
A very good, approachable

A very good, approachable workout plan/book for both males and females is "Body for Life" by (I think) Bill Phillips. In three months, you'll get into great shape via the "BFL" workout/eating plan. I, as well as several of my friends/associates, followed the system and I got respectably buff in under 3 months. Unfortunately, due to health concerns (not related to the BFL plan) I had to stop (but will resume in the next few months), but the system definitely works if you dedicate yourself to it. In most cases that I witnessed, the results were amazing!

The book was a best seller recently, and I believe the author has a website if you want more info. You'll find the book at just about any bookseller. Give it a shot!

qoj hpmoj o+ 6uo73q 3Jv 3svq jnoh 77V

Bill Loguidice
Bill Loguidice's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
Motivation - Find your own and keep getting new...
Matt Barton wrote:

I find that I really struggle just to keep the mojo going for working out. I'll be into for a few days, then get discouraged or just apathetic and sit out for awhile. Eventually I'll feel guilty and go back to it, but it's hard. I just don't see how those guys that seem to live in the gym can do it. It can be quite boring if you don't have anyone to talk to or work out with.

Indeed, motivation is a tough one. I sometimes get motivated by the bodybuilding magazines I get. Sometimes by the books I have. Sometimes by other stuff in my archives. When I was working out at a gym, I would get motivated by the other people there, particularly the girls. Seeing other people is a big factor. Music obviously helps as well, as there's music for everyone that gets their juices flowing. The key is keeping things fresh. That's another reason why it's important to change up your workouts and order fairly often, as I've found that to be motivating. Once you start to really dread a particular workout, it's time to change things up.

By the way, I highly recommend you rent "Pumping Iron" if you've never seen it. If that doesn't get you motivated, I don't know what will. It was Arnold's second movie appearance and obviously the only one truly as himself. That was truly a different time in bodybuilding. There was a certain hardcore camaraderie and a certain something special back then in the pro circuit in the 70's that got lost during the fitness boom of the 80's. The workouts and atmosphere were raw, but not primitive, if that makes any sense. It also helps that the steroids were in rather milder use and formulations than they came to be by the 90's.

======================================
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director
Armchair Arcade, Inc.
======================================

n/a
Matt Barton
Matt Barton's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/16/2006
Working out
Bill Loguidice wrote:

The real effort and results come from free weights, but that's not practical for many people unless they can go to a gym or have the room to put a proper setup in. Indeed, one of the hallmarks of good workouts is variety and keep giving yourself fresh challenges.

That sounds on the money to me. I don't have access to free weights except through the U, and I'd have to pay for membership (very reasonable, but still an extra expense I don't need). I guess now that Weekly World News (the Elvis lives paper) has stopped printing I will have more spending money, though. ;-)

I find that I really struggle just to keep the mojo going for working out. I'll be into for a few days, then get discouraged or just apathetic and sit out for awhile. Eventually I'll feel guilty and go back to it, but it's hard. I just don't see how those guys that seem to live in the gym can do it. It can be quite boring if you don't have anyone to talk to or work out with.

n/a
Bill Loguidice
Bill Loguidice's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
Chiros and Weights
Mark Vergeer wrote:

Funny, when I do work out I too put on muscles more quickly on upper-legs and lower arms, chest muscles and slower on sholders and calves. But I am just not the type of person that enjoys working out on those exercise machines in the gyms making repetitive movements - running nowhere in particular....

Bill, weekly visits to the chiropractor? Why? Do you have such a bad back?

It's basically maintenance, yeah. My back has never been great and I finally got frustrated with constantly getting a stiff neck. I also have a sciatic nerve in my right leg, but there's not much that can be done for that. As for working out with weights, machines are only one element. The real effort and results come from free weights, but that's not practical for many people unless they can go to a gym or have the room to put a proper setup in. Indeed, one of the hallmarks of good workouts is variety and keep giving yourself fresh challenges.

======================================
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director
Armchair Arcade, Inc.
======================================

n/a
Mark Vergeer
Mark Vergeer's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/16/2006
Funny

Funny, when I do work out I too put on muscles more quickly on upper-legs and lower arms, chest muscles and slower on sholders and calves. But I am just not the type of person that enjoys working out on those exercise machines in the gyms making repetitive movements - running nowhere in particular....

Bill, weekly visits to the chiropractor? Why? Do you have such a bad back?



Editor / Pixelator - Armchair Arcade, Inc.

n/a

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.